From Green Right Now Reports

Pelican before and after being washed at the International Bird Rescue and Rehabilitation Center, May 13, 2010

Pelican before and after being washed at the International Bird Rescue Research Center, May 13, 2010

Bird rescue workers continue to await the worst effects of the oil spill in the gulf, which has yet to make landfall.

“This is the most unique spill we’ve been in, in the sense that there is a large amount of oil sitting out there that keeps flowing from the ground but it hasn’t made this massive impact on birds yet. The good thing is [that] it’s given us time to set-up centers,” said Jay Holcomb, executive director of the International Bird Rescue and Research Center, which has rescue operations set up on the coastal tip of Louisiana.

“I guess this is the silver lining in this situation.”

But Holcomb warned that when the crude washes ashore, it will likely be disastrous for the pelicans who are feeding babies in their nests at this time of year.

“The bad thing is that we know the potential could be really great…the potential is really – can be
catastrophic if it impacts the nesting islands where all these pelicans have babies right now – and terns and gulls and other birds,” he said in a news call this week.

Or, he noted, the spill “could just somehow not do that”.

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Pesticides | Global warming | Gulf oil spill