From Green Right Now

The first half of 2012 was the hottest Jan-June period in the contiguous US states since record-keeping began 118 years ago, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)*.

Overall, it was 4.5 degrees Fahrenheit above normal across the contiguous U.S., a record-breaker brought on by aberrantly warm springtime months followed by a sizzling June in a wide swath of the U.S., encompassing the Northeast, Ohio River Valley and the Great Plains. The South and Southwest also experienced above normal temperatures.

Twenty-seven states recorded their hottest ever first half of the year. They are:

Arkansas — 4.5 degrees above normal

Colorado — 6.4 degrees above normal

Connecticut — 5.2 degrees above normal

Delaware — 5.3 degrees above normal

Illinois — 5.9 degrees above normal

Indiana — 5.5 degrees above normal

Iowa — 7 degrees above normal

Kansas — 6.1 degrees above normal

Kentucky — 4.3 degrees above normal

Maryland — 4.8 degrees above normal

Massachusetts — 4.6 degrees above normal

Michigan — 6.2 degrees above normal

Missouri — 6 degrees above normal

Nebraska — 6.2 degrees above normal

New Hampshire — 5.3 degrees above normal

New Jersey — 4.9 degrees above normal

New York — 5.4 degrees above normal

North Carolina — 2.9 degrees above normal

Ohio — 5.3 degree above normal

Oklahoma — 4.9 degrees above normal

Rhode Island — 4.3 degrees above normal

South Dakota — 7.2 degrees above normal

Tennessee — 4.1 degrees above normal

Texas — 3.5 degrees above normal

Vermont — 5.4 degrees above normal

Virginia — 3.7 degrees above normal

Wisconsin — 7 degrees above normal

* NOAA is reporting these Jan.-June averages as “preliminary” because data continues to be collected. “Above normal” is calculated against the average 20th Century temperature norms for a given location.