San Francisco Green Film Festival spotlights rising oceans, climate ‘outlaws’ and green awakenings in Detroit and China

San Francisco’s Green Film Festival kicks off this week, with 40 films from around the world and dozens of directors and speakers slated to appear at showings from March 1-7. The second annual festival also will feature US premieres of foreign films, such as Waking the Green Tiger, a chronicle of China’s rising eco-awareness, and Just Do It: A Tale of Modern Day Outlaws, which follows activists in Great Britain on a whirlwind of zany actions to stop polluters. See snapshots of these two films, and two other fascinating works, Urban Roots and Blood in the Mobile, below.

WorldWatch Institute program highlights solutions to world hunger

We in America have grown up hearing how we live in a world of plenty, and for many of us, that has been true.

But hundreds of millions of the world’s human residents have so much less than ‘plenty’, they don’t even have adequate food.

WorldWatch Institute, which tracks human welfare around the globe, reports that 265 million people are malnourished, and continue to suffer from food shortages because they lack the ability to safely store crops or keep produce fresh.

WorldWatch sponsors a program, Nourishing the Planet, that’s taking a closer look at how to alleviate hunger in Africa and elsewhere, and not necessarily through food giveaways, but through innovative solutions that help imperiled populations become more food secure.

The project’s team members have pinpointed one cause of food scarcity that can be found in SubSaharan Africa and in the United States: Food waste.

A brutally honest look at our industrial food system

CAFO: The Tragedy of Industrial Animal Factories, a large format book of essays and photographs exposing America’s uber-industrialized animal food production system, presents a flurry of disturbing content.

There are pictures of pigs, cattle and chickens in degrees of distress, packed into facilities lined with mud, manure and dead or dying inhabitants.

Vertical farms could help feed cities, save land and reduce pollution

New York City has one of the most recognizable skylines in the world. It’s famously tall buildings provide maximum occupancy for minimum space, making an ideal situation for a rapidly growing population.
When millions of immigrants flocked to America in the late 1800’s, the need for space to put them all caused the city to grow up instead of out and skyscrapers sprouted like weeds.
The human population is growing. By the year 2050, it is estimated that we will be another 3 billion people. By that time 80 percent of the world’s population will live in urban areas.