Neighborhood redefined: A photo tour of the EcoVillage at Ithaca

The EcoVillage at Ithaca is a showcase of sustainable living that demonstrates how humans can live more lightly on the land, clustering buildings together at the heart of a mass of native plantings, vegetable gardens and wildlife-friendly woods and pastures. Our photo tour captures the flavor of this grand experiment in low-carbon living, though we only scratched the surface of this green community marvel in upstate New York.

Clarkson U opens an all-local food grill, reducing ‘food miles’ and raising yumminess

Little did they know, when the students of Clarkson University pushed to have a more sustainable campus, they’d be learning to love goat cheese. Even Executive Chef Kyle Mayette admits goat cheese is an acquired taste. But it is a vital component of a delectable chicken sandwich that’s winning over hearts, minds and palates at Clarkson’s new all-local food grill.

Environmental experts will converge on Austin for SXSW Eco, Oct. 7-9

SXSW Eco will host its third annual conference Oct. 7-9, which is expected to draw more than 3,000 attendees to see speakers on green power, energy efficiency, urban gardens, sustainable design, climate change mitigation, bike trails, mass transit, organic agriculture and nature conservation, to name a fraction of what will be featured at this green showcase at the Austin Convention Center. The public is invited to attend.

Kermit goes green

It’s not easy being green if you’re Kermit, Texas, a small town so far off the beaten track you can’t even see it from Midland. But that hasn’t stopped the tiny municipality from jumping to become the Permian Basin’s leader in banning plastic bags.

Sharing the land in India, supporting farmers in Mexico and Australia and other cool ways people are stopping desertification

Desertification threatens lands across the planet as weather extremes worsen and development strips areas of protective trees and vegetation.The process displaces farms, wildlife, green areas and impoverishes local people by stealing their means of support. But groups around the world are finding unique, organic and sustainable solutions that push back desertification.

Bloom Town: The wild life of American cities

One of America’s hottest cities and one of its coldest may have more in common than you would guess. In places like Phoenix and Minneapolis, scientists think that cities are starting to look alike in ways that have nothing to do with the proliferation of Starbucks, WalMart or T.G.I Fridays. It has to do with the flowers we plant and the fertilizers we use and the choices we make every spring when we emerge from our apartments and homes and descend on local garden centers.

350.org Massachusetts ends vigil over political ‘climate silence’ to escape the actual effects of climate change

We can probably safely award today’s “Most Ironic Story” award to 350.org Massachusetts.

The group had been holding a 24/7 vigil (that may be redundant) to draw attention to the “climate silence” that has characterized the presidential campaign and some races for Congress, such as the contest between Sen. Scot Brown and challenger Elizabeth Warren.

GOP senators try to force-start Keystone pipeline, despite Obama’s order for additional review

ess than a month since the Obama Administration delayed the proposed Keystone XL tar sands pipeline for at least a year, a group of GOP senators is trying to force the project to begin anyway.

The partisan showdown is led by Sen. Richard Lugar (R-Ind.), minority chair of the Foreign Relations Committee. Supporters include 37 other senators, including those from Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas, which would host segments of the 1,700 mile pipeline.

Environmentalists praise Obama’s decision to review Keystone pipeline route

Environmentalists cheered the surprise announcement today that the U.S. State Department will re-evaluate the route of the proposed controversial Keystone XL pipeline project, and praised President Obama for ordering the reconsideration.

“The president didn’t outright reject the pipeline permit…But a few minutes ago the president sent the pipeline back to the State Department for a thorough re-review, which most analysts are saying will effectively kill the project. The president explicitly noted climate change, along with the pipeline route, as one of the factors that a new review would need to assess,” wrote environmental activist Bill McKibben on the TarSandsAction.org blog.

New York secures land in Adirondacks for jobs and recreation

A few hours due north of NYC or northwest of Boston – depending on how you’re oriented – are some of the most pristine and beautiful woodlands imaginable.

Snowmobiling in the Aidirondacks (Photo: NY State Snowmobile Assoc. and the Pleasant Riders SNC).

The Adirondacks region – famous as a getaway for fall foliage sightseers, hikers, skiers, hunters and fisherman – encompasses hundreds of lakes, mountains and miles of rich woodland habitat. It’s territory that cradles wildlife, from trout to moose, and gives birth to the Hudson River.

At its center, the 6 million acres Adirondack Park, is the largest publicly protected park in the nation, bigger than the Yellowstone, Everglades and Grand Canyon national parks.

350.org captures Earth’s woes and hopes from space

Climate action group 350.org wants us to see, really see, what’s happening as the result of climate change here on Earth.
So it’s taken to space to get a better view. Satellites began snapping photos of giant art installations, many involving humans forming pictures, last Friday and will continue through this week. The photos include one of a giant eagle in Los Angeles, created to represent the “Earth to Sky” solutions to climate change; a mural in New York City that shows how the area would look after the seas rise; a picture of a girl on a delta in Spain and a flash flood in New Mexico created by humans with blue posters.

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