Houston’s forum asks how to make energy, environment, economy work together

Energy, the Environment, & the Economy: Making It Work will air on Houston PBS Channel 8, on Tuesday at 7 p.m.

Hosted by journalist, Patricia Gras, the televised community forum will try to find “common ground” on issues related to the global recession, Texas’ fight with the U.S. EPA over air permits and the BP oil disaster.

“Energy, the environment and the economy are of utmost importance to each and every one of us who calls this region our home,” said Catherine Mosbacher, President and CEO of the Center for Houston’s Future, in a statement about the program.

The nonprofit think-tank partners with PBS and Houston Community Newspapers to put on the forum which will feature questions the audience and call-ins from viewers.

Thousands plan climate action events for 10-10-10 Work Party

350.org demo in Xalapa Mexico 2009 (Photo: 350.org)


Thousands are expected to take actions to fight, mitigate or prepare for climate change at this weekend’s 10-10-10 Work Party organized by 350.org.
More than 7,000 events are planned in countries around the globe. They include both the highly symbolic — President Nasheed of Maldives, which stands to be annihilated by rising oceans, will kick off the weekend by helping install solar panels on his official residence — to small, meaningful neighborhood actions. Some will install gardens; others will weatherize houses, plant trees at schools or clean up natural areas. There will be work events followed by play such as concerts and picnics.

Put Solar On It campaign challenges heads of state

Climate activists have launched a campaign calling on world leaders to take tangible clean energy action by putting up solar panels on the presidential digs.

The advocates are enlisting the public’s help in the Put Solar On It movement by providing a way to send an online note to U.S. President Barack Obama, India’s President Pratibha Patil, China’s President Hu Jintao, Mexico’s President Felipe Calderon, Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron and Australia’s Julia’s Gillard.

EPA invites public to meetings on fracking

People who want to know more about how hydraulic fracturing in the natural gas industry might affect drinking water, can attend EPA meetings in July in Texas, Colorado, Pennsylvania and New York.

These states have witnessed increases in natural gas drilling, as oil and gas companies tap stores thousands of feet beneath the surface in areas such as the Marcellus Shale in New York and the Barnett Shale in Texas.

Google this: Carbon emissions for your city or town

By Barbara Kessler
Green Right Now

As we drive deeper into our Orwellian future ala Google, where you can practically peer into our uncle’s windows in Toledo via Google Earth, it makes complete sense that we should also be able to track how we’re corrupting the atmosphere.

Thus, today, you can view CO2 emissions, thanks to a new Google Earth application developed by Purdue University researchers and funded by NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Purdue Showalter Trust and Indianapolis-based Knauf Insulation.

The interactive CO2 emissions map will mostly confirm what you already know – that it’s getting thick out there, especially in cities like Los Angeles, plagued by higher than average auto emissions, and Houston, afflicted with bad air from industrial processes like oil refining. This is readily apparent because the chart color codes carbon pollution from different sectors, such as aircraft, on road and off road transportation; commercial and industrial sources; electricity production and residential emissions.