Farm Kings will make you feel guiltier than The Biggest Loser, but you also may get inspired

Cops. Lawyers. Doctors. Even ice road truck drivers have all received their due on TV, either in fictional or “true life” series. It was about time farmers got some exposure. Meet the inordinately attractive and active King family of Freedom Farms in western Pennsylvania. They’ll get you learning about CSAs, family farms, and as a bonus, show what biceps look like when they’re used every day. Indeed, you may get healthier just watching this show on Great American Country TV.

‘Chasing Ice’: Powerful film captures gorgeous, undeniably vanishing glaciers

It was with some trepidation that I settled in to watch Chasing Ice, a movie about the rapidly vanishing glaciers that contain the majority of earth’s freshwater. But it didn’t leave me or my fellow viewers feeling helpless, and it didn’t harangue us with a fire hose of facts. Rather it did what great movies are supposed to do, and what the film’s protagonist has been working for years to do: It showed us that the earth’s warming temperatures and seas are melting arctic ice at a scary pace.

‘Queen of the Sun’ filmmakers tell how honeybees are dying, and could take us with them

Rachel Carson once warned the world that the pesticides we were using to kill weeds were devastating birds, threatening to bring on a ‘Silent Spring’. People woke up and banned the potent herbicide DDT, saving the American Bald Eagle and countless song birds (and fish, farm animals, trees and more). They began to control pollution and clean up rivers and lakes, answering Carson’s clarion call.

San Francisco Green Film Festival names winners

If you’re looking for green films to watch, check out these latest winners from the 2nd Annual San Francisco Green Film Festival. The films were selected from among more than 40 screened at the festival, which drew 2,000 participants and concluded March 7….You’ve Been Trumped…Urban Roots….Blood in the Mobile…Coalition of the Willing…Sushi

San Francisco Green Film Festival spotlights rising oceans, climate ‘outlaws’ and green awakenings in Detroit and China

San Francisco’s Green Film Festival kicks off this week, with 40 films from around the world and dozens of directors and speakers slated to appear at showings from March 1-7. The second annual festival also will feature US premieres of foreign films, such as Waking the Green Tiger, a chronicle of China’s rising eco-awareness, and Just Do It: A Tale of Modern Day Outlaws, which follows activists in Great Britain on a whirlwind of zany actions to stop polluters. See snapshots of these two films, and two other fascinating works, Urban Roots and Blood in the Mobile, below.

Ted Turner and Jeff Skoll to be honored for environmentalism

Environmentalist and media mogul Ted Turner and social media and entertainment entrepreneur Jeff Skoll will be honored at the 20th Annual Environmental Media Awards this Saturday in Los Angeles.

Natalie Portman will present Skoll with the EMA Corporate Responsibility Award. Jane Fonda will present Turner with the EMA Lifetime Achievement Award.

Skoll, the founder and chairman of Participant Media, the Skoll Foundation, and the Skoll Global Threats Fund, has supported social entrepreneurship and investment in sustainability in many ways. The Skoll Foundation has funded the Amazon Conversation Team, the American Council on Renewable Energy, Ceres, Forest Trends and the Global Footprint Network. Skoll’s Participant Media has created and financially supported entertainment that inspires social change, such as the films An Inconvenient

James Cameron says its cheaper to address climate now

Speaking at the AREDAY conference in Aspen, Colo., this past weekend, Avatar filmmaker James Cameron addressed a key point on many minds, that with the current vacuum of national leadership, the U.S. appears in danger of slipping behind in the race to a clean energy economy
More importantly, Cameron said we have “just a few years” to begin an aggressive program to mitigate climate change or we risk paying a high price, economically and ecologically, he said, invoking what should be a motivator for everyone: our children’s future.

Food indulgence in America: How attitudes weigh us down

By Paula Minahan
Green Right Now

Piles of cracked and broken shells. Gnawed bones pushed aside. Remnants of what tempted with shameless excess. And in the background, a young Army recruit observes, “This is what we fight for, you know. Not so you can waste food, but so you can have plenty.”

It’s just another day at one of Sin City’s copious casino buffets as depicted in the award-winning documentary, Buffet: All You Can Eat Las Vegas. The film, shown on PBS and at indie festivals nationwide, is MIT cultural anthropology professor and filmmaker Dr. Natasha Dow Schüll’s sometimes humorous, often outrageous look at American indulgence.

“Las Vegas is a great exemplification of things that are shared, that are afoot in American culture in a very extreme way,” says Schüll. “All over America, the buffet amplifies things endemic to our society. It doesn’t surprise me this kind of waste, which is celebrated as a public ritual at the buffet, is carrying over to the more private domain of the household. It’s very OK to throw out food.”