What your drought-tolerant landscape could look like

Drought-tolerant landscapes are an idea whose time has come. Many homeowners in Austin get this. Here’s a look at several non-lawn lawns that may inspire you. While they almost all require getting rid of that pesky turf, they’re easy to maintain later on. Most importantly, they’re not overly thirsty.

Save nature and free time — install a Pocket Prairie

Are you weary of mowing, weeding and fertilizing that yawning stretch of lawn? Consider installing a patch of native prairie. A Pocket Prairie can reduce your thirsty conventional turf, replacing it with native grasses and flowers. You’ll be feeding butterflies and birds, and cut down your grass mowing obligations, perhaps to zero.

Cultivate a ‘Responsible Bathroom’ courtesy of American Standard

We tell our children to turn off the tap while they’re brushing their teeth. Which is a good idea. It saves a little water and gets them thinking about natural resources.
But then we grown-ups clomp across the room and use three gallons of clean potable water to flush the toilet. And we do this repeatedly, throughout the day.

Xeriscaping: The path to water independence


(Photo: Green Right Now)

There’s been a lot of talk lately about energy independence. Important, no doubt. But we need to think about preserving water too, and nothing works harder toward this goal – or offers as much creative satisfaction – as Xeriscaping. In this endeavor, one could say that being green means dialing down the green in your lawn, giving up some of that solid sheet of thirsty turf and committing more area to a low-water garden that features rocks, flowering plants, shrubs and low-growing trees. That is Xeriscaping, getting away from landscaping that drinks up too much precious water.