Quantcast

Hot Topics

Ceilings painted with light colors reflect light downward, which will make room lighting more efficient.
Search

Follow Us

facebook_logo Twitter_promo

My Twitter Friends

Friends: Followers:

Story Archive

Tagged : endocrine-disruptors


11 ways to avoid BPA and phthalates and why you should

March 7th, 2014

Reduce your exposure to estrogenic phthalates and BPA by avoiding synthetic fragrances and putting hot food in plastic containers. Here are more ways to lower your contact with these synthetic, endocrine-disrupting compounds.

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , , ,

Under court order, the FDA will review anti-bacterial ingredient Triclosan in 2014

January 9th, 2014

US regulators have taken a first step toward placing limits on the controversial ingredient triclosan, which is used in antibacterial soaps and an array of other personal products, despite studies suggesting it poses a threat to human health and the environment.

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , ,

5 reasons to quit using weed-and-feed chemicals

March 9th, 2012

Ah, spring. You can smell it on the air — that bracing ammonia smell wafting off your neighbor’s lawn; the acrid odors at the local home store, where the first six aisles have been packed with heaping bags of the season’s poisons.
Hydramethylnon, glyphosate, dicambra, atrazine and 2,4-D.
There’s a little something to wipe out every potential lawn and garden interloper, but the most popular consumer weapons in the annual war on nature are the “weed and feeds.” These fertilizers-herbicide combos were conceived of more than 50 years ago in the US to enrich turf grass, while simultaneously stamping out invading weeds.

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Study shows how plastic additives from food packaging accumulate in humans

March 30th, 2011

You are what you eat. But according to a new study, you also are what your food was wrapped or packed in, at least to a small degree.

And if that food was enclosed in plastic or plastic resin-lined cans, it could be having an effect on your health.

Researchers investigating whether the endocrine-disrupting plastic chemicals BPA (bisphenol A) and DEHP migrate from food packaging into humans have found evidence that they do.

The study, by researchers from the Silent Spring Institute, the Breast Cancer Fund and Vassar College, sampled the urine of 20 participants in 2010, testing the levels of BPA and DEHP while the study subjects ate a regular diet containing canned and packaged foods, and then again when the study group was placed on a fresh food diet.

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , , ,

Common herbicide atrazine emasculates male frogs in study

March 3rd, 2010

strong>From Green Right Now Reports

Blame lawns. And Big Ag. A new study looking at the effects of the common pesticide atrazine has found that it emasculated three-quarters of the male frogs exposed to the chemical.

It turned one in ten of the male frogs into females.

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , , , , , , , ,

‘Slow Death by Rubber Duck,’ a tale about the chemicals within us

February 17th, 2010

By Barbara Kessler
Green Right Now

Concerned about all those dangerous household chemicals you keep hearing about: BPA, phthalates and pesticides with cryptic names like 2,4-Dioxane?

We’ve found just the book for you.

Slow Death By Rubber Duck:The Secret Danger of Everyday Things (Counterpoint, 2009. U.S. $25) will take you on a chilling, but informative ride through our chemically enhanced consumer product world. Starting with your kid’s Rubber Duck, which contains five chemicals of concern, imagine what the rest of the household contains.

Frankly, I worried that this cleverly titled book about the dangerous additives lurking in our house dust, furniture, hand soaps and Teflon pans would be just that, an inspired title followed by surface information. But I was quickly relieved of that concern. Co-authors Rick Smith and Bruce Lourie are not just scratching the stick-resistant surface here.

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , , , , , , , ,

An interview with ‘Slow Death by Rubber Duck’ co-author Rick Smith

February 17th, 2010

By Barbara Kessler
Green Right Now

Having just read and reviewed Slow Death By Rubber Duck, I had a few questions for co-author Rick Smith, head of Environmental Defence Canada.

And since his book was costing me — some $120 for a new set of stainless steel cookware to replace my stick-free, Teflon-coated set — I thought he owed me some answers.

We chatted earlier this week, while he took advantage of Family Day in Canada, visiting a playground with his young boys, a strong impetus behind his work to educate the public about harmful environmental and household toxic chemicals. The younger generation, he worried, has an even higher ‘body burden’ of chemicals than we adults grew up with.

In the book, he and co-author Bruce Lourie, an environmental consultant, test common toxics to find out how they get from consumer goods and food into our bodies. In fact, they ingest or expose themselves to these chemicals to chart the effects.

The basic idea: Since many of these toxic ingredients have been shown in lab experiments to act as endocrine disruptors and cancer triggers figuring out how to limit or reduce our exposure could have positive health effects, for kids and adults.

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

PBDEs shown to build up in people eating high fat poultry and red meat

July 16th, 2009

From Green Right Now Reports:

A new study shows that chemicals found in flame retardants also are turning up in certain meat — and no, they’re not there intentionally to quell that internal fire from the barbecue.

These chemicals, known as PBDEs (polybrominated diphenyl ethers) have been shown to have negative health consequences; they’re suspected of interfering with the human endocrine system and fertility and causing neurological damage. Until now, that meant we might want to evaluate the PBDEs in our upholstered furniture and mattresses, get our babies out of “flame retardant” clothing, and reduce our exposure to other things made with polyurethane foam and fabrics required to be flame retardant.

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , , ,

Keeping Spot and Rufus flea and toxin free

April 25th, 2009

Fleas happen. So do ticks. With the trees in full leaf and the back of the lot thick with weeds, I know the hounds will soon be targets. Typically, I just shave them (the dogs not the parasites), wash them with something obnoxiously fragrant and hope for the best.

I gave up chemical dog collars awhile back, about 1992. (Reasons in a moment.) But knowing that the dogs are miserable with fleas (not to mention how miserable we’d be sharing their fleas) and that they can get Lyme disease if they pick up a tick, I’m well aware this isn’t a perfect solution. I have fed them garlic powder, a home remedy, but with mixed success.

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , , , , , , ,

Potential endocrine-disrupting pesticides to be tested

April 16th, 2009

By Harriet Blake

The EPA has issued a list of pesticides that will be screened for possibly disrupting the human, as well as animal, endocrine system. The list, released Wednesday, focuses on “endocrine disruptors” which are chemicals that can negatively impact hormones produced by the endocrine system. The system regulates all biological processes in the body – specifically, growth, metabolism and reproduction.

“Gathering this information,” said EPA Adminstrator Lisa P. Jackson, “will help us work with communities and industry to protect Americans from harmful exposure. Endocrine disruptors can cause lifelong health problems, especially for children.”
The endocrine, or hormone, system is found in all mammals, birds and fish. It is made up of glands, hormones that are produced by the glands and receptors in different organs that respond to the hormones.

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

FDA says BPA plastic is safe

August 18th, 2008

By Barbara Kessler

After an outbreak of bad publicity earlier this year over bisphenol-A (BPA), the plastic additive which dozens of studies identify as a potential carcinogen and endocrine disruptor, the U.S. government promised to take another look. Its conclusion: BPA is safe.

The Federal Drug Administration had previously cleared BPA for use in an array of consumer products, such as clear plastic baby bottles, the resin lining in food cans and many other items. It promised a new review of the science after Canada proposed a ban of BPA in baby bottles and manufacturers of polycarbonate water bottles began voluntarily giving up BPA. All cited concerns over the plastics’ tendency to leach when when warmed and possible harmful effects on humans, particularly children.

[Read more →]

Tags: · , , , , ,

Featured Bloggers

Subscribe to Our Newsletter
Subscribe to Our Newsletter


E-mail Address:
HTML         Text
Writer Bios | About Greenrightnow | Contact Us
© Copyright 2014 Greenrightnow | Distributed by Noofangle Media