‘Little Things Matter’ video shows how kids are hurt by small toxic exposures

Blood testing shows that even babies have small amounts of toxic chemicals in their bodies. But how much do these small exposures matter? Chemical manufacturers say these trace amounts are not harmful. But research shows that even miniscule levels of lead and other chemicals lowers IQs in kids. This video argued that ‘little things’ matter.

Campbell’s Soup vows to remove BPA from can linings

Campbell’s soup lovers, who may not love that the world’s largest soup maker uses the harmful chemical BPA in its can linings, may soon be able to rekindle their love affair with the company’s immortal chicken noodle soup.
Campbell’s has announced that it will indeed it replace BPA with a safer alternative in its epoxy steel can liners, as soon as it finds “feasible alternatives, according to a report in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Saks T-shirt will benefit breast cancer research

If you’ve been anywhere at all in the last few years, you’ve seen dozens of variations on t shirts promoting breast cancer awareness, research and solutions.
The latest iteration, designed by Donna Karan and sold by Saks Fifth Avenue stores, is worth a fresh look. It’s not your midriff-creeping Saturday morning t crammed with local sponsor names. This little item from Donna Karan t shirt could go to lunch with jewelry, even dinner, and more importantly, 100 percent of the proceeds of its sale will go to benefit local charity partners of Saks’ Key to the Cure campaign.

Study: BPA changes testosterone levels in men

Studies with lab animals have shown that BPA, the chemical found in certain clear plastics, can disrupt developing endocrine and hormone systems.
A new study with humans suggests that BPA exposure also affects mature hormone systems. Researchers looking at a group of 715 Italian men, ranging in age from 20 to 74, found subtle but measurable differences in testosterone levels, with men registering higher BPA levels also showing an uptick in hormone levels.

Help contain plastics by knowing your plastic containers

By Kelly Rondeau
Green Right Now

It’s the holiday season, and along with the many joys that are associated with this fun time of year – cooking, baking, parties with friends and family – comes a lurking environmental problem: Toxic chemicals in everyday plastics. Plastics that seem to be everywhere in our holiday midst — in the packaging of toys, the toys themselves, our food packaging, in our holiday leftover storage containers, in plastic wrap, in water bottles — and the list goes on.

Many valid health concerns have been raised about poisonous chemicals present in our everyday plastics, and the headlines about these toxins leaching into our food are frightening. A recent Milwaukee Journal Sentinel investigation found, for instance, that food containers labeled as “microwave safe” leached BPA when heated. (See our report, “BPA turns up in ‘microwave safe’ products“.)

BPA turns up in “microwave safe” products

By Barbara Kessler

BPA or Bisphenol A, the plastic additive that has been found to leach from hard plastic water and baby bottles when they are heated, also is released when certain disposable containers labeled as “microwave safe” are heated, according to an analysis by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

The newspaper tested 10 disposable food containers, heating them and then testing the contents for BPA. It found that BPA leached from all of the containers, including some labeled as plastics numbers 1, 2 and 5, and not just those labeled as number 7, the identifier for polycarbonate plastic known to contain BPA.
The tests included frozen dinners, microwavable soups, baby and toddler foods – all packed in plastics that could presumably be heated.

Health fears about BPA plastic spread with Canada pushing for a ban

By Barbara Kessler

Bisphenol A, the controversial component found in plastic baby bottles, took another image hit last week when the Canadian government announced it would be drafting regulations to ban the sale or importing of bottles containing the chemical.

Canadian Minister of Health Tony Clement called the step a milestone for Canada, which he said would be the first country to take regulatory action against the chemical. BPA is commonly found in polycarbonate or clear, hard plastics and can usually be identified by the number seven stamped within the recycling triangle on the bottom of containers.

BPA – now a potential saboteur of breast cancer treatment

By Barbara Kessler

The news on bisphenol A or BPA just doesn’t get better. The chemical, used to make plastic baby bottles and food can liners, could deliver a double-whammy to women, paving the way for breast cancer, and then boomeranging back to interfere with the treatment for cancer recovery.

A study by University of Cincinnati scientists released this week found that BPA exposure may reduce the effectiveness of chemotherapy treatments for breast cancer patients.

Researchers found that this man-made chemical – already implicated as a potential trigger in breast cancer because it is structurally similar to the estrogenic DES – induced a group of proteins in the body to protect breast cancer cells from the chemotherapy.

Resistance to chemotherapy is already a “major problem for cancer patients, especially those with advanced metastatic disease,” said UC’s Nira Ben-Jonathan, a professor of cell biology who’s been studying BPA for more than a decade.

FDA says BPA plastic is safe

By Barbara Kessler

After an outbreak of bad publicity earlier this year over bisphenol-A (BPA), the plastic additive which dozens of studies identify as a potential carcinogen and endocrine disruptor, the U.S. government promised to take another look. Its conclusion: BPA is safe.

The Federal Drug Administration had previously cleared BPA for use in an array of consumer products, such as clear plastic baby bottles, the resin lining in food cans and many other items. It promised a new review of the science after Canada proposed a ban of BPA in baby bottles and manufacturers of polycarbonate water bottles began voluntarily giving up BPA. All cited concerns over the plastics’ tendency to leach when when warmed and possible harmful effects on humans, particularly children.