Is your college promoting sustainability? Sierra names the top greenest universities for 2012

U of Conn students collect sneakers to donate to Nike's Reuse-a-Shoe program, which turns them into track and playground surfaces.

Sierra magazine’s top 10 “Coolest Schools” are working hard to solve global warming, and their students are literally taking on the world by developing more sustainable food, buildings, energy sources and transportation.

10-10-10 Work Party shows that thousands worldwide want climate action

Climate change has been a matter of debate in government circles and a talking point on news channels for many years now. But increasingly, the climate change discussion — the need to slow global warming pollution, deforestation and the loss of wildlife — is becoming a citizens’ round table.
This past weekend’s 10-10-10 work parties, rallied people of all ages, economic strata and religious beliefs who turned out in groups of 5, 10, or 100 to build gardens, promote carbon neutral transportation, plant trees and protest fossil fuels.

Thousands plan climate action events for 10-10-10 Work Party

350.org demo in Xalapa Mexico 2009 (Photo: 350.org)


Thousands are expected to take actions to fight, mitigate or prepare for climate change at this weekend’s 10-10-10 Work Party organized by 350.org.
More than 7,000 events are planned in countries around the globe. They include both the highly symbolic — President Nasheed of Maldives, which stands to be annihilated by rising oceans, will kick off the weekend by helping install solar panels on his official residence — to small, meaningful neighborhood actions. Some will install gardens; others will weatherize houses, plant trees at schools or clean up natural areas. There will be work events followed by play such as concerts and picnics.

The top 10 energy companies that spend the most lobbying Congress

The Center for American Progress Action Fund published an article this week highlighting the millions that energy and utility companies have spent lobbying Congress.

The article contends that this downpour of money into Washington — half of a billion dollars since 2008 — has been the key factor in stalling climate action by Congress.

The chart above shows that the top fossil fuel industries and electric power companies have spent heavily in Washington. What their lobbyists have been saying is not revealed in the dollar amounts, but CAPAF report outlines how most of these companies are on the record as opposing climate legislation, fees for carbon pollution and EPA regulation of greenhouse gases.

Ellen Page promotes 10-10-10 work party for climate action

Climate action group 350.org announced today that it has logged more than 5,200 events that are planned for this year’s work party on Oct. 10, 2010.

That means the 10-10-10 work party will likely surpass participation in last year’s worldwide demonstration in which people in 181 countries turned out for 5248 events aimed at raising consciousness about climate change. CNN called that 350.org event the “most widespread day of political action in the planet’s history,” noted 350.org founder Bill McKibben.

Public health leaders send Congress a message: Let EPA regulate carbon pollution

America’s public health leaders have raised their voices against Congressional waffling over climate action, releasing a letter today signed by 120 top public health groups that urges Congress not to interfere with the EPA’s plans to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

The EPA’s mandate to regulate carbon emissions has been a lightning rod in Washington, with some in Congress saying the agency does not have the authority to set carbon guidelines and penalize violators. States, such as Texas, have sued over the issue, also trying to stop the EPA from regulating greenhouse gases.

Climate inaction…again. So what now?

By Asher Miller

Asher Miller, executive director, Post Carbon Institute

Back in December in blisteringly cold Copenhagen, tens of thousands of activists, government workers, lobbyists, and world leaders came together for what many hoped would be a diplomatic breakthrough. Though the weather was cold, conditions seemed ripe: Environmental groups across the globe had worked hard to generate a strong display of public will, culminating in 350.org’s Day of Action earlier in October, which CNN called “the most widespread day of political action in the planet’s history.” Bolstered by the announcement that President Obama would attend the talks personally, hopes were high for meaningful engagement on the part of the United States after more than a decade of inaction.