Nature in Danger: The Red Wolf

Red wolves, commonly mistaken as coyotes, have stunning copper and gray coats. They live in packs composed of one alpha male and one female, along with their litter. When their pups are age 2, the males begin the search for another female to start their own packs, and their parents continue having litters once a year.

Defend nature: Ask Congress to donate oil contributions to gulf wildlife restoration

Environmental groups come up with a lot of inspired campaigns. Some, like Greenpeace and the Rainforest Action Network, are masters of eco-guerilla warfare, turning up at national icons or even in grocery stores with campaigns that make us think about deforestation, oil dependence and climate change.

Defenders of Wildlife is not such a showy group, but they work in their own way to connect the dots, trying to find solutions to wildlife issues. They’ve been instrumental in working toward peaceful solutions between ranchers and wolf advocates in the Rocky Mountains.

Wolves back under protection

The Rocky Mountain gray wolves are back on the Endangered Species List after a federal judge ruled last week that the government did not follow the law in removing the wolves from federal protections last year. The new ruling means that the wolf hunts in Montana and Idaho that claimed 260 wolves during the 2009-2010 hunting season will not resume this fall.

Green groups need your year-end donations

By Barbara Kessler
Green Right Now

Now that you’ve worn off the magnetic strip on the credit card buying presents for everyone, gotten the letter that your health insurance premiums are doubling and your job is being “redefined,” it’s time to think about those year-end donations. Sigh.

While environmental groups will likely have an easier time on Capitol Hill next year talking policy with a new Administration that sees global warming as a real threat, they paradoxically could be facing headwinds with donors.

Consider first that some of their large contributors may have been dragged down in the Bernard Madoff securities/Ponzi scheme, which savaged many charitable foundations. While the extent of that damage is being assessed, it’s safe to assume that even nonprofits that escaped that five-alarm fire, have been singed by the economic meltdown.