Nature in Danger: The Iberian Lynx

Iberian Lynxes have jaguar-like spots. (Photo: World Wildlife Fund)


This rare, critically endangered felid is the world’s most threatened cat. Only about 100 are left, according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which lists them as “critically endangered“. Their ideal habitat is open grassland for hunting, mixed with shrubs and maquis thicket. However, habitat loss has forced them into more mountainous areas. Roaming mainly throughout Spain and possibly Portugal, the Lynx pardinus is a fearless, solitary hunter that wildlife conservationists say must be protected.

Irreplaceable Wildlife: Exhibit Pictures Species In A Warming World

Update: The photo exhibit Irreplaceable is on display at the San Francisco Public Library gallery through the holidays. It heads to Los Angeles, to the G2 Gallery in Venice, for the month of January. It will move to Washington D.C. in the spring; the dates will be announced.

By Barbara Kessler

Polar bears, penguins and caribou are all facing an uncertain future as global warming melts their arctic climates.


Photo: Wendy Shattil/Bob Rozinski

If only they were the only species at risk. Tragically, these arctic animals have many cousins in similar straits in lower latitudes: From the American Crocodile to the Monarch Butterfly; the Green Sea Turtle to the Mountain Goat; the Grizzly Bear, Lynx, Mountain Yellow-legged Frog, Sugar Maple and Northern Flying Squirrel. An array of amazing mammals and marine life, as well as plants, is imperiled by climate change.

The effects are being observed already, as populations dwindle, critical habitat becomes inhospitable and breeding or wintering grounds warm.

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