How to Avoid GMO Foods

Genetically modified foods are everywhere, having crept into processed foods as key components, such as corn oil, corn flour, high fructose corn syrup, soybean oil, soy isolate, invert sugar and on down the food label. How can a consumer cope? Until GE foods are labeled, shoppers have to ferret out the non-GMO foods and ingredients.

Eco-Thanksgiving, Part 2: The veggies

Sweet potatoes, rich in beta carotene; but peel off the pesticide residues.

With Thanksgiving and the winter holidays upon us, we’re continuing our guide to the potential chemical and genetic engineering hazards in the holiday feast.

We looked at the Turkey (and faux turkeys) in Part 1. Now on to the veggies! One bright spot about vegetables is that medical research continues to verify the power of eating veggies in protecting against illnesses, even cancer.

The people vs. their food — the fight over Prop. 37 in California

On Nov. 6, California voters will say yea or nay to Proposition 37, which would require labeling for genetically modified or GM foods.

The issue, which became a ballot initiative after getting nearly a million petition signatures this past spring, appears to have wide popular support, according to polls. But it faces stiff opposition from pesticide makers like Monsanto, food companies, and dozens of California agricultural operations and business groups. Led by Monsanto, the opposition has collectively spent more than $34 million in advertising and public relations efforts opposing Prop. 37.

You cannot avoid GMO foods easily, but this Shopper’s Guide can help

This month as I prowled the web getting educated on the GM food battle percolating in our capital and courtrooms (as farmers sue Monsanto, and vice-versa), I stumbled upon a useful little booklet: The “True Food Shopper’s Guide” to avoiding GMO foods.

Created by the Center for Food Safety, which has been all over this issue of genetically modified (GM) or genetically engineered (GE) foods for several years, the guide is a lifesaver if you’re looking to reduce your exposure to edibles that have been genetically altered by Monsanto, Bayer, Syngenta and Dow Chemical.

Union of Concerned Scientists raises questions about genetically modified corn for biofuel

By Barbara Kessler
Green Right Now

Corn-based ethanol, once a star on the alternative energy scene, has fallen from favor in the past year, battered by reports that raising corn for fuel raids the world’s pantry and that corn ethanol has a heavier carbon footprint than originally thought.

Many now argue over whether the US should continue to grow corn for fuel or make the switch to grasses that can be grown on less desirable land, with fewer pesticides and fertilizers, or use plant waste to make fuel.

Now a new debate looms: Should the US allow genetically altered corn to be grown for use as biofuel?

The Union of Concerned Scientists wants to stop that genie before it leaves the bottle, because it believes that genetically modified corn will inevitably mix with and contaminate corn grown for food products.