McDonalds says no to genetically modified potato

Sound the fryer timer. The potato wars have begun. Last week a new genetically modified potato designed to produce less of a carcinogenic byproduct when fried won approval from the USDA. This week, McDonalds says, naw, probably not going to use it. Food activists are elated. It’s starchy. It’s complicated. Read on.

Biodynamic wine: The ultimate sustainable drink

Biodynamics is a down-to-earth approach to growing and producing wine – and many other foods — that hews to organic methods and replicates nature’s biodiversity by using cover crops, buffer zones, farm animals and farm-generated composts. While it harkens back to the old ways, it may just be the future, as commercial methods using heavy pesticide applications outstay their welcome.

Why the FDA’s plan to reel in antibiotics for livestock puts Americans at risk

Antibiotic-resistant diseases are depriving Americans of good health every year, with 23,000 people dying from diseases that were untreatable because antibiotics failed to work.

This week, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) sprang into action – 30 or so years into this growing problem — to take aim at a major culprit, perhaps the major culprit, the livestock producers who routinely administer antibiotics to make animals…

Scientists criticize French study of GMO corn

Research by French scientists showing that rats fed GMO corn developed tumors and died prematurely has prompted the French government to continue its ban on genetically engineered crops.

But the study came in for criticism from scientists in other countries shortly after it was published Wednesday in Food and Chemical Toxicology.

The hidden costs of hamburgers

Here’s a temperate report that rounds up the reasons to rein in the mass production of government-subsidized beef.

It doesn’t promote an all-or-nothing approach (i.e., it’s not a vegetarian advocacy piece), but it does argue that beef production is out of control and urges Americans and other big beef producers to evaluate the damage caused by these systems.

Another reason for chocolate

Turns out that the sour candy you’ve been dishing out to the kids because it’s got fewer calories, and well, they love it, has some serious consequences for their teeth.

Not only do the gummy versions (and to a lesser degree the chewy, crystallized, hard and foamy varieties) get stuck in their teeth, some of the really sour, tangy stuff is acidic enough to eat away at tooth enamel, according to the report out this week by the California Dental Hygienists’ Association.

This Halloween, we are advising adults to think twice about buying sour candies for trick-or-treaters, said Erika Feltham, a Registered Dental Hygienist and CDHA member who has studied this issue for more than a decade.