How we can cultivate a better food system in 2013

s we start 2013, many people will be thinking about plans and promises to improve their diet and health. But we think a broader collection of farmers, policy-makers, and eaters need new, bigger resolutions for fixing the food system – real changes with long-term impacts in fields, boardrooms, and on plates all over the world. These are resolutions that the world can’t afford to break with nearly one billion still hungry and more than one billion suffering from the effects of being overweight and obese. We have the tools—let’s use them in 2013!

Should Earth become a planet of vegetarians?

When I saw that headline on a story in The Guardian, it was like I’d been waiting for it. It struck me as both amusing, in its implication that vegetarianism would be a tough fate even though we’d likely be healthier for it, and also as an inevitability, with which I’d already come to terms.

But the story itself is not funny.
Here was the lead paragraph:

Cargo bikes deliver food for city harvest and help the hungry in NYC

By Barbara Kessler

Biking. It’s not just for hearty commuters and weekend racers anymore. With the energy pinch on, people are finding more uses for two- or three-wheeling, whether it’s puttering to school or the grocery. Even businesses are finding ways that bikes can solve problems.

Take City Harvest in New York City. The food rescue agency collects leftovers and unwanted produce from farmer’s markets, restaurants and groceries, and delivers it to various agencies and soup kitchens serving the poor and displaced.