Recycling would be good business — especially for mined metals

Waste not want not.

How many of us heard this little saying from our parents during our sloppy, wanton, wasteful childhoods?

I’d say the percentage who received this advice was higher than the current rate of recycling for all plastics, which comes in at an unimpressive 8 percent, according to an article in Scientific American about how we’re failing to recycle many raw resources, like metals and petroleum-derived plastics.

The high price of cheap jewelry

Samples of inexpensive jewelry tested by a consumer group found that more than half of the products contained high levels of either lead, cadmium, arsenic, mercury bromine or chlorine — all toxic metals or chemicals that carry health risks.
HealthStuff.org tested 99 pieces of jewelry from 14 different retailers, Ming 99 City, Burlington Coat Factory, Target, Big Lots, Claire’s, Glitter, Forever 21, Walmart, H&M, Meijers, Kohl’s, Justice, Icing and Hot Topic. The samples were collected from six states — Ohio, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New York and Vermont.