Kids paying cash for lunch eat healthier, Cornell study shows

The more current the currency, the better kids eat, according to a study that looked at how payment methods in public school lunch systems affect food choices. The study, by Cornell researchers funded with a government grant, looked at two types of payment methods in public school cafeterias, those that accept only pre-loaded debit cards and those that accept cash or debit card.

How we can cultivate a better food system in 2013

s we start 2013, many people will be thinking about plans and promises to improve their diet and health. But we think a broader collection of farmers, policy-makers, and eaters need new, bigger resolutions for fixing the food system – real changes with long-term impacts in fields, boardrooms, and on plates all over the world. These are resolutions that the world can’t afford to break with nearly one billion still hungry and more than one billion suffering from the effects of being overweight and obese. We have the tools—let’s use them in 2013!

People who skip breakfast tend to weigh more; sugary drinks and snacks partly to blame

Breakfast is important. You’ve likely heard this before, and now, the evidence is growing.

Research shows that the 18 percent of Americans older than 2 who regularly skip breakfast tend to weigh more and have other unhealthy habits, like eating too many sugary drinks or snacks, according to food experts speaking at the Institute of Food Technologists 2012 annual meeting in Las Vegas.

These simple life changes can save billions in costs — yes, billions

There’s been a lot of talk about the billions of dollars we spend in the US for healthcare, and how so much of that money goes toward treating illnesses that could have been prevented, such as heart disease or diabetes, which are closely associated with overeating and a sedentary lifestyle. But there’s another major preventable medical condition that contributes to the healthcare drain on our society.

This sounds a lot like deep fried death

Reading Scientific American this week, I became transfixed with a little graphic the editors included at the back of the magazine.
It showed how the number of Americans who are seriously overweight has doubled over the past 30 years. Thirty four percent of Americans are now considered obese (meaning they have a body mass index over 30), compared with 15 percent who met that criteria in 1980.

The number of Americans who are overweight (with a BMI of 25 to 30) has remained almost steady; but that still means that the overweight and the obese together now comprise a hefty 68 percent of the population.

Food indulgence in America: How attitudes weigh us down

By Paula Minahan
Green Right Now

Piles of cracked and broken shells. Gnawed bones pushed aside. Remnants of what tempted with shameless excess. And in the background, a young Army recruit observes, “This is what we fight for, you know. Not so you can waste food, but so you can have plenty.”

It’s just another day at one of Sin City’s copious casino buffets as depicted in the award-winning documentary, Buffet: All You Can Eat Las Vegas. The film, shown on PBS and at indie festivals nationwide, is MIT cultural anthropology professor and filmmaker Dr. Natasha Dow Schüll’s sometimes humorous, often outrageous look at American indulgence.

“Las Vegas is a great exemplification of things that are shared, that are afoot in American culture in a very extreme way,” says Schüll. “All over America, the buffet amplifies things endemic to our society. It doesn’t surprise me this kind of waste, which is celebrated as a public ritual at the buffet, is carrying over to the more private domain of the household. It’s very OK to throw out food.”