Texas bans shark fin trade, closing the biggest US source

Texas has banned shark fin trading, ending what had become a major US source for the Chinese buying the fins, which are considered a delicacy used to make soup. But the world cannot afford such profligacy, according to conservation groups, which blame shark finning for driving shark populations into a steep decline. Texas’ move may help turn things around for the oceans apex predators.

The state of our oceans, in a clamshell

Our oceans, long taken for granted, are being stressed by pollution, over-fishing and climate change. Plastic gyres, swirling pools of plastic refuse, occupy several spots in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. The largest one, in the North Pacific, is estimated to exceed the size of Texas….These linked, but disparate problems — pollution, unsustainable fishing practices, jobs at risk — won’t be solved easily. That’s why several environmental and conservation groups working around the globe have formed the Global Partnership for Oceans. The groups hope that together they can work to save the marine environment before human pressures cause natural fisheries to collapse.

Oceana’s ‘Ocean Heroes’ include shark group and head of oiled bird rescue

Dr. Jay Holcomb, IBRRC directorOn the just the second annual World Oceans Day, the world seems to be making a bigger mess than ever of its marine resources as the BP spill spews gooey crude across the Gulf of Mexico.

But against that backdrop, the work of Oceana’s honorees for the day, stands out as critically important. The two top winners of Oceana’s Ocean Heroes