Texas bans shark fin trade, closing the biggest US source

Texas has banned shark fin trading, ending what had become a major US source for the Chinese buying the fins, which are considered a delicacy used to make soup. But the world cannot afford such profligacy, according to conservation groups, which blame shark finning for driving shark populations into a steep decline. Texas’ move may help turn things around for the oceans apex predators.

Save the fishes — yeah!

Confession: I’m a mom, and I like rap, and I tolerate a suburban overlay.

So maybe I was primed to like this video. But I think teens getting together to spread a message about ocean conservation is well, it should make some adults think a little more about this subject.

Diver shows another side of sharks, who are being slaughtered for their fins

Leila Monroe, NRDC

William floats silently – breath held, his whole body exposed, face-to-face with a gigantic tiger shark. Why has he presented himself, unarmed, at the jaws of this massive apex predator? Some have attributed his actions to thrill seeking and bravado, but in an interview with this world class athlete, I learned his motivation is much more interesting and purposeful than that.

William Winram has spent most of his life in and around the ocean – free diving, fishing, surfing, and now working to gather information and spread education about the most misunderstood creatures of the sea. Today, as you’ll find on his website, William holds a number of unusual job titles: Shark Publicist, Ocean Environmentalist, Underwater Model, Photographer, and Videographer.

His fascination with sharks began at an early age, then gestated into a career after a life-changing encounter with a 13 foot tiger shark in Baja, Mexico. While spear fishing one morning, he became aware of a huge shark following him. For a moment, the terrible images of Hollywood movies flashed through his mind, but he remained calm and swam slowly toward shore. The shark kept a safe distance,

Experts say spill’s affect on wildlife still a guessing game

A bottle nose dolphin (Photo: NASA) The BP oil spill will affect ecosystems in the gulf for a long time and is certain to affect the entire “food web,” wildlife experts said Friday. But the government’s team leaders for the rescue and assessment of wildlife could not give projections for, nor would they hazard guesses about, how bad those effects might be.