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Tagged : home-gardens


Get leaner and greener with homegrown food

October 24th, 2011

This year has been a time of financial re-assessment at our home, as it has been across America with so many people struggling with job losses, job insecurity and flat wages.

While incomes stagnate, the cost of everything from food to higher education rises. At our house we’re tightening the budget to adjust for what will be eight years or more of supporting kids at college. With the recession creating an uncertain road ahead, and tuition costs continuing their staggering ascent, up 10-fold since we parents went to school, it’s a sobering time. And stories from the Occupy front remind us that our current practices, like saddling college kids with huge debt, are unfair and unworkable. In this new reality, there are few easy solutions.

And with that prelude, I’d like to talk about food, because this is one area where we eke out some results, during a time when big answers seem elusive. By changing our relationship with food, we can save money, improve our health and push the populist cause.

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A front yard garden in Memphis becomes ground zero for home-grown food fight

September 22nd, 2011

If you think people should have a right to plant vegetable gardens wherever they want on their property, including the front yard, you need to know about Adam Guerrero.
He’s a a school teacher in Memphis who planted a veggie garden in front of his house, turning a non-productive patch of grass into a food generator. Guerrero uses his garden to teach his students about self-reliance, and nutrition.

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A chat with Fritz Haeg about the American front lawn

October 6th, 2010

(Fritz Haeg’s Edible Estates: Attack on the Front Lawn has been revised and reissued by Metropolis Books. Here, in an interview with the American Society of Landscape Architects blogger, Jared Green, Haeg discusses how a remake of the American neighborhood lawn aesthetic could be both practical and artistic. Haeg is an artist, designer, gardener and writer whose temporarily in Italy on a 2010-2011 Rome Prize Fellowship.)

Q: In the new edition of your book Edible Estates: Attack On The Front Lawn, you argue that ripping out front lawns and replacing them with fruit, vegetable, and herb gardens can “ignite a chain reaction of thoughts that question other antiquated conventions of home, street, neighborhood, city.” Why does this start with the front lawn?


Fritz Haeg

The front lawn is wrapped up in our ideas of the American dream. It’s a very iconic and loaded space. When you remove it and replace it with something else, you are questioning all of the values implicit in the lawn and what it stands for. It is significant to me not just because it’s a private space that’s very public – so visible in our cities and such an obvious opportunity to reconsider – but also because of what it symbolizes. The easiest first step for the urban citizen who wants to make a visible impact on their city is to go out that front door and get their hands in the dirt. It is the leading wedge into more complex and ambitious civic activity.

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Bonnie Plants says it was a victim of tomato blight, not the culprit

July 28th, 2009

From Green Right Now Reports:

Bonnie Plants, which recently removed more than $1 million in tomato plants from retail nurseries in the Northeast, reported in a statement this week that the move was preventative and aimed at curtailing the spread of Late Blight.

The recall should not be taken as an indication that its plants were responsible for the blight that is threatening tomatoes and potatoes in the region, the company said.

The first reports of tomato blight in the Northeast came in late June, yet even two weeks later on July 7 government inspectors had not detected any blight among plants being cultivated by any of Bonnie’s 61 growers, Bonnie reported.

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